Monday, September 3, 2012

jQuery 1.8.1 Released


jQuery 1.8.1 is released on 30th Aug, 2012. This version fixes the issues reported by the community following the final release of 1.8.0. Here are the files, ready for you to use:

The Google and Microsoft CDNs will also have copies available soon.

The final set of bugs that were fixed are listed below. Don’t forget, folks, we love to hear about bugs in the betas and release candidates too! You don’t have to wait for a final release to test with your code. The earlier we can fix these bugs, the smoother things go for both the team and the jQuery community.

Use jQuery UI 1.8.23 and jQuery Mobile 1.1.1 or later for best compatibility with jQuery core 1.8.1.

Monday, August 13, 2012

jQuery 1.8 Released


jQuery 1.8.0 is released by jQuery on 09-Aug-2012 by jQuery team.

New Features:

Sizzle re-architected: jQuery’s selector engine is faster than ever, thanks to a rewrite (well, reallytwo rewrites) by Timmy Willison. Sure, most browsers have querySelectorAll nowadays, but nearly every implementation falls short in one way or another, creating a road full of cross-browser potholes. Sizzle smoothes that road for you. Plus, you may want those useful jQuery selector extensions like :has() with a complex selector or :contains(). Oh yeah, and there’s still IE6/7 support.

Animations re-imagined: Over time, the animation code in jQuery had become kind of messy. Corey Frang took a head-first dive into that swamp and managed to remove most of the alligators, um, bugs. Most of the changes are under the covers, so existing animations should just work (and work better). But there are also some awesome additions to make animations more general and extendable. One notable and very cool feature is the use of the progress callbacks in Promises. We’re still working on detailed documentation, but we do have a draft. Also, here’s an example of the new code in action:

Automatic CSS prefixing: When you use a CSS property, in either .css() or .animate(), we’ll use the correct prefixed property (when appropriate) for that browser. For example, take.css("user-select", "none"); in Chrome/Safari we’ll set the value as "-webkit-user-select", Firefox will use "-moz-user-select", and IE10 will use "-ms-user-select".

More flexibility with $(html, props): In jQuery 1.8, you can use any jQuery method or plugin in the object passed to $(html, props). Before, you could only use a short list of method names, and there was no documented way to add to the list. Now there doesn’t need to be a list at all! Be aware, however, that this can cause the behavior of your code to change if plugins are added later that have the same names as HTML attributes.

More than 160 bugs closed: The Sizzle and animation rewrites in particular provided the impetus to fix several long-standing bugs–some of which have been around for two or three years. Mike Sherov tackled most of the open CSS and positioning issues, getting us down to near-zero bugs there. We also haven’t given up and are still pounding away to eliminate annoying differences between IE 6/7/8 and modern browsers, so you don’t have to deal with them.

Smaller code size: Despite all the code cleanup, new features, and bug fixes, the gzipped file size of jQuery 1.8 is actually a few hundred bytes smaller than jQuery 1.7.2. Size reduction wasn’t our primary goal in this version, but we felt it was important to hold the line on code growth, and we definitely achieved that. Many thanks to Richard Gibson for leading the code-crunching charge across the entire project.

Modularity: If you know your project’s jQuery dependencies well, you can use the new grunt-based build system to strip out parts of jQuery that you know you don’t need. What we’ve done here for 1.8 is really just a beginning, you’ll see even more flexibility as we move to later versions.

Thursday, April 12, 2012

SQL Server 2012 Released

Microsoft released SQL Server 2012 on 02-Apr-2012. Those wanting to get their hand on the bits can follow this link. However, it leads to an evaluation copy of SQL Server 2012, which is good for six months

Microsoft changed the product editions with this release. Enterprise edition is now the top-of-the-line product that comes with "unlimited" virtualization rights. The BI edition is a new product for organizations interested in using Microsoft's business intelligence improvements in SQL Server 2012. Finally, Microsoft offers a Standard edition.

On top of the evaluation edition, Microsoft offers a free SQL Sever 2012 Express edition for lightweight use, which can be downloaded here.